Clubs & Societies

BLEWBURY LOCAL HISTORY GROUP

November 3, 2016

There are times when we feel overcome with papers, letters, books, photos. And things.

Even though Blewbury is quite a small village we do seem to generate a lot of records, so we are going to have a real attempt to collect all the stuff we have accumulated over the years and make it more accessible. For example, how many of us know that the Village Hall in 1926 might have been built next to the Load of Mischief? And what were the fashions in the 1930s and 40s? All information somewhere amongst our records. Our next meeting will be a sort-out of some of the boxes here; should be fun, provided we don’t get too sidetracked by interesting items as we do it. We hope all our regular members will come and help, and newcomers are always welcome.

The next meeting is on Nov. 8th at 8pm in the History Room, Parsonage Lane. Simply turn up, or to find out more, contact Audrey Long, 850427/audreyrosettalong@gmail.com or Mark Palethorpe markpalethorpe@talktalk.net.

 

Blewbury Local History Group

September 27, 2016

Our next meeting is on October 11th at 8pm as per usual at our Parsonage Lane room.

Anyone is welcome to attend. We are planning our talks for 2017, two speakers have already been booked and we are seeking more. Do you know of any that might be suitable? There are a number of items we are to cover this meeting and new members are always welcome to assist with our projects. Did you know we have this year cleaned the Knight and wife effigy in the Churchyard and also commissioned a study of its origins and how we might preserve it? Lots of things happen behind the scenes and our group has access to many artefacts, books, articles and photographs relating to the village. For details contact either Audrey Long on audrey.long@waitrose.com or Mark via email markpalethorpe@talktalk.net

 

An invite from Blewbury Bell Ringers

Looking for a new hobby this autumn?

Wanting to meet new people in Blewbury and the surrounding villages? Like doing something with gentle physical and mental exercise in a fun and social environment? Enjoy doing something worthwhile for the village community? If any of these apply, then bellringing could be for you! A recent BBC news item highlighted the modern day challenges of attracting people to take up this rewarding pastime (visit goo.gl/vbsu4w). Blewbury is no exception to this and although we currently have an enthusiastic team, we really do need to encourage more people to learn to ring and help us to maintain the tradition of village bellringing for the future.

Come to a taster evening on Tuesday 4th October and meet some of the ringers, see up close how a bell works, have an assisted go at ringing a bell and enjoy a chat over a cuppa. Come along anytime between 7.30 – 9.00pm to St Michaels church on 4th October. If you are unable to make it on 4th, you will be welcome to join us on any Friday practice evening. For further information contact Richard Loyd 07767 463285 or Chris Cook 07786 635062

BELL RINGING NEWS FROM BLEWBURY TOWER

August 23, 2016

One blink and the summer is fast disappearing and by the time you read this we will be at the end of August!!

The summer has been an enjoyable one for the bell ringers, with several weddings in Blewbury to ring for and outing arranged by our local branch of the Oxford Guild of bell ringers. We rang at five towers in Berkshire and Hampshire, starting in Goodworth Clatford and ending in Highclere, with a pub lunch and afternoon tea included. The day ended with the annual branch BBQ, enjoyed by all who attended. Outings are always good fun and not only for ringers, often their families come along and enjoy exploring the lovely villages that we visit. It is surprising how much bells can vary in different towers, and ringing elsewhere certainly makes the Blewbury ringers appreciate our very well maintained bells.

It would be great to have more ringers in Blewbury. So if you are looking for a new hobby that has a good mix of physical, mental and social, then please come up the tower and join us for a ‘taster’ evening on Tuesday, 4th October any time between 7.30 and 9.00pm. You will have a chance to see the bells, have a brief go and can ask the ringers what it’s all about over a cup of tea (or coffee!) and a biscuit.

Hope to see you then. If you would like more information please contact Chris Cook on 07786635062

Cricket: The scent of victory

June 7, 2016

A scintillating spell of fast bowling from Scott Harris rushed Blew Wallies to a lightning victory over Horley on June 4.

The paceman took 7 for 11, including a hat-trick that turned into a four-wicket maiden (followed up by a wicket maiden), as the home side were blasted out for 43 in only 12.1 overs. Harris has been in top form all season, but this performance was red-hot, with all but one of his victims (who was caught in the slips by Mark Carey) bowled or lbw. His new-ball partner, the county teenager Tom Gould, played Morne Morkel to Harris’s Dale Steyn, taking 3-36. Blewbury & Wallingford 1sts wasted little time in chasing down their target, with Carey (22) the only man to fall as Blew Wallies breezed to a nine-wicket win in the ninth over. The Division 3 game was done and dusted by 2.30pm, as Blew Wallies move up to 2nd in the table.

Several of the 1st XI came back to Boham’s Road to watch the 2nds making a game of a low-scoring encounter with a largely youthful Challow & Childrey 3rds in Division 9(S). Having been put into bat on a sluggish surface, Blew Wallies made 113-6 off 45 overs. Stuart Edwards carried his bat for 45, while Ian Saunders produced two stunning strokes (a lofted off-drive and a clubbing pull) in his 24 before falling as he tried to break the bowlers’ stranglehold. Joe Harris, a left-arm spinner who turned it both ways, was all but impossible to play, and bowled 14 overs for only 15 runs. Blew Wallies’ skipper Mark Cox showed touches of his class with a delicate late cut and a sumptuous backfoot square drive off the pacy teenager Fergus Fishburn, but was run out before he really got going. The final total felt at least 30 runs shy of being competitive.

With Neil Smith as canny as ever and 14-year-old Ollie Mew running in purposefully and hitting the pitch hard, Blew Wallies made life difficult for the opposition’s openers, though. The breakthrough came when the astute Roger Podbery mistimed first-change off-spinner Richard Clayton’s long-hop straight to Jack Vincent at mid-wicket. The 13-year-old made no mistake. As Clayton found his range and Smith plugged away, 28-1 became 45-5 and Blew Wallies could sense the unlikeliest of wins. Yet the experienced pair of Philip Cox and Gary Rees slowly closed the door on this potential great escape, with what became a match-winning partnership of 72. Still, the 2nds deserve plenty of credit for keeping the result in the balance for as long as they did.

Cricket: Feeling the pressure

June 15, 2016

Blew Wallies lost ground in the Division 3 promotion race on June 11 after being beaten at home by Cublington. The away side’s winning margin was 58 runs.

At around the midway point of Cublington’s innings, however, Blew Wallies had looked in a promising position, with three wickets from the in-form Scott Harris having helped to reduce the visitors to 105-5. Yet a defiant and at times flamboyant 103 from Kit Gordon-Stuart ensured Cublington reached 194 when they were all out in the 44th over. The batsman’s effort was all the more impressive because he had previously averaged only four in his four Cherwell League innings to date this season.

In reply, only Russell Brown (41) and Harris (26) mustered any real threat to the opposition’s total. By the time captain Colin Allen made 17 batting at No 9, the game was up, and a weakened 1st XI were dismissed for 136 in the 36th over. The 2nds had a week off, but also slipped down the Division 9(S) table due to other results.

In mitigation, it ought to be said that having a sufficient number of players to field two teams every Saturday is becoming hard to achieve. Anyone in the Blewbury area interested in playing even the odd game this season is strongly urged to get in touch. You’d be most welcome whether you’re 13 or 53 or, indeed, almost any age. Check out www.blewwallies.co.uk for details.

BLEWBURY’S SECRET SUFFRAGETTE?

March 21, 2016

In one corner of the Blewbury’s old cemetery in Boham’s Road are two fairly ordinary graves, which are the main reminder that the village has of two women, Gladys Hazel and Dr Gertrude Austin, who retired to Blewbury in the 1930s and lived in a newly built bungalow in Westbrook Street, with Gladys’s school age nephew, Peter Waterfield.

They lived there for over twenty years during which time Peter grew up, went to Oxford University, married the daughter of the Vicar of Didcot, and then left the village to pursue a career as a school teacher and head teacher. Peter, now in his 90s, lives in Cornwall. Just last year, to his amazement, he came across an old manuscript which turned out to be his Aunt Gladys’s memoirs. These memoirs reveal that, in her earlier life, she had been a very active, militant Suffragette. She was born in 1880 and had become a school teacher in Birmingham, when she was invited to a tea party, which was addressed by Emmeline Pankhurst sometime around 1908. Fairly soon after that she became heavily involved in the Suffragette movement, working in their offices in Birmingham, Leicester and Bristol over a period of several years. Passive campaigning led to more militant activity. On one occasion for example, she describes stepping into the middle of a road to obstruct a troop of mounted police during a visit to Birmingham by Asquith. The cavalcade was forced to part either side of her to great cheers and laughter from the assembled crowd. She calls it her “first taste of heady power” and writes: “I was immensely exhilarated”. Not all acts of defiance were as enjoyable. During the time she was in Holloway Prison, Gladys took part in a hunger strike and was force fed. In her memoirs she describes the occasion when the now famous Emily Wilding Davison attempted suicide in Holloway, trying to end the suffering and force feeding of others. “My cell door was open and a warden hurried to me calling: ‘Come quick!’ I followed her out to the gallery. And there was Emily Davison. She was sitting with her feet hanging down over the stairway her face closed and set. The warden said, ‘Speak to her and stop her doing it.’ I felt suddenly full of [emotion] and in a sort of rage and I said, ‘Why? She’ll be well out of it.’ And I turned away. I heard her fall and saw her lying across the steps as they hustled me into my cell.” Earlier in 1912 she had been involved in a demonstration in New Bond Street in London. She was arrested after smashing several windows of Asprey’s store, but while being led away by a burly policeman still managed according to his account in court to ‘break two more windows’. So this quiet old lady living in Westbrook Street from 1939-1959 had quite a colourful past campaigning for women’s rights, and it seems that no-one living in Blewbury at the time knew anything of her past. Her nephew has very fond memories of his time in the village, and is collaborating with the Local History Group to ensure that his aunt’s exploits on behalf of such an important cause are not forgotten. Anyone else with relevant information about Gladys and Gertrude is encouraged to contact the group. Roger and Elizabeth Murphy